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Ocean Exploration: 2019

2019 Southeastern U.S. Deep-sea Exploration – Remotely Operated Vehicle and Mapping Operations (EX1907)

October-November 2019: From October 31 through November 20, 2019, NOAA and partners will conduct mapping and remotely operated vehicle operations from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer to collect critical baseline information about unknown and poorly understood deepwater areas of the Southeastern U.S. continental margin.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.

2019 Southeastern U.S. Deep-Sea Exploration - Mapping (EX1906)

October 2019: From October 5 - 26, 2019 the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research and NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer conducted systematic ocean mapping operations in U.S. federal waters offshore from Georgia and Florida, in a region called the Blake Plateau.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.

Search for the U.S. Revenue Cutter Bear

September 2019: From September 14-28, NOAA and the U.S. Coast Guard searched for the U.S. Revenue Cutter Bear. USRC Bear, which served nearly 80 years in the Revenue Cutter Service, the Coast Guard, and the Navy, has a rich history of meritorious service in the Arctic, the North Atlantic, and Antarctica.

 

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.
 

From Aggregations to Individuals: Exploring Migrating Deep-sea Scattering Layers Through Multiscale-multimode Technologies in the Gulf of Mexico

July-August 2019: A multi-institutional science team performed test deployments of two autonomous sampling platforms, the Driftcam and Slocum glider, in waters of the West Florida Shelf. These technologies may permit access to the deepwater habitats and allow the study of organisms that comprise scattering layers in the Gulf of Mexico without the need to interfere or capture the animals.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.
 

2019 Technology Demonstration (EX1904)

July-August 2019: NOAA and partners conducted a telepresence-enabled ocean exploration technology expedition on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer to demonstrate, test, and evaluate five emerging and existing technologies for possible integration into NOAA operations.

Raineault, N. A., & Flanders, J. (2020). New frontiers in ocean exploration: The E/V Nautilus, NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, and R/V Falkor 2019 field season. Oceanography, 33(1). doi:https://doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2020.supplement.01

Microbial Stowaways: Exploring Shipwreck Microbiomes in the Deep Gulf of Mexico

June-July 2019: Stowaways hide aboard a vessel as a means of (free) transportation. During a nine-day expedition on board the R/V Point Sur, scientists from the University of Southern Mississippi, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, and the Naval Research Laboratory discovered and characterized two unexplored, wooden-hulled shipwrecks in the Gulf of Mexico, and study the microbial stowaways living secretly on and around them, to explore how shipwrecks shape the microbial biodiversity of the deep sea.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.
 

Windows to the Deep 2019: Exploration of the Deep-sea Habitats of the Southeast United States (EX1903)

May-July 2019: From May 30 through July 12, 2019, NOAA and partners conducted a two-part, telepresence-enabled ocean exploration expedition on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer to collect critical baseline information about unknown and poorly understood deepwater areas of the southeastern United States.

Auster, P. J., Cantwell, K., Grubbs, R. D., & Hoy, S. (2020). Observations of deep-sea sharks and associated species at a large food fall on the continental margin off South Carolina, USA (NW Atlantic). Journal of the Ocean Science Foundation, 35. doi:https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3932138
 

E/V Nautilus: 2019 Field Season

May - October 2019: From May to October, the Exploration Vessel (E/V) Nautilus, a 64-meter research vessel operated by the Ocean Exploration Trust, will be used to document and survey unexplored regions along the West Coast of the United States and in the Central Pacific, including American Samoa and U.S. Territorial Islands. This marks the Nautilus’ fifth year of exploration in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and is one of the most extensive seasons to date.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.
 

DEEP SEARCH 2019: DEEP Sea Exploration to Advance Research on Coral/Canyon/Cold seep Habitats

April 2019: From April 9 to 30, 2019, NOAA and partners at the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management and the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a research expedition on NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown to collect critical baseline information about deepwater habitats offshore the U.S. Mid- and South Atlantic coasts.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.

Surveying Deep-sea Corals, Sponges, and Fish Habitat

October-November 2019: From October 7 to November 7, 2019, scientists and engineers conducted a 29-day expedition aboard NOAA Ship Reuben Lasker along the California, Oregon, and Washington coasts, exploring the deep sea, one of the largest, but least known environments on Earth.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.
 

HACON: Hot Vents in an Ice-covered Ocean: The Role of the Arctic as a Connectivity Pathway Between Ocean Basins

September-October 2019: From September 19-October 16, a team of oceanographers participated in on a voyage of discovery to explore in detail for the first time a hydrothermal vent field in the Arctic Ocean.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.
 

Deep Connections 2019: Exploring Atlantic Canyons and Seamounts of the United States and Canada (EX1905)

August-September 2019: From August 6 through September 15, 2019, NOAA and partners conducted a telepresence-enabled ocean exploration expedition on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer to collect critical baseline information about unknown and poorly understood deepwater areas of the U.S. and Canadian Atlantic continental margin.

Raineault, N. A., & Flanders, J. (2020). New frontiers in ocean exploration: The E/V Nautilus, NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, and R/V Falkor 2019 field season. Oceanography, 33(1). doi:https://doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2020.supplement.01

Finding Boundaries in the Deep Sea

July-August 2019: From July 26 - August 26, 2019, scientists on the Schmidt Ocean Institute's R/V Falkor will study the benthic (seafloor) communities of Nintoku, Jingu, and/or Koko Seamounts in the North Pacific to determine if/how the water masses bathing the seamounts influence the difference in the deepwater fauna between the Aleutians and Hawaii.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.
 

Gulf of Alaska Seamounts 2019

July-August 2019: From July 21 – August 3, 2019, a multi-disciplinary and international team sailed to the Gulf of Alaska Seamounts region to collect data to help us better understand the diversity of marine life in this underexplored region of economic importance that is also poised to undergo unprecedented change.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.
 

Journey into Midnight: Light and Life Below the Twilight Zone

June 2019: From June 8-22, a team of researchers explored the water column in some of the deepest parts of the Gulf of Mexico in order to determine what happens to deep-sea animals when a very important constraint is taken away from them – that of light. They made observations and collected samples for further study on the characterization of visual systems, bioluminescence, and fluorescence of organisms living below 1,000 meters (3,280 feet), in the bathypelagic (midnight) zone.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.
 

Paleolandscapes and the ca. 8,000 BP Shoreline of the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf

June 2019: Scientists conducted remote sensing and sub-bottom profiler surveys to determine if people were living along the now-submerged northwestern Gulf of Mexico and coastal Texas and Louisiana as early as 13,000 years ago.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.
 

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer: Shakedown and Sea Trials 2019: An Unexpected Shipwreck Discovery (EX1902)

May 2019: On May 12, NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer set sail for a 13-day shakedown and sea-trial expedition in the Gulf of Mexico. On May 16, while conducting an "engineering dive" to test new remotely operated vehicle (ROV) equipment, the team made an unexpected – and exciting – discovery: the wreck of what is likely a mid-19th century wooden sailing vessel.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.

Connectivity of Coral Ecosystems (CYCLE) in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico

April - May 2019: This was the first year of a five-year study to investigate population connectivity for key coral, sponge, and fish species between shallow and mesophotic reefs of the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary and its proposed expansion areas to the east.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer: 2019 Expeditions Overview

October 2018 - September 2019: From October 2018 to September 2019, the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research will lead nine expeditions on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, primarily focused on exploring deepwater areas in the North Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea.

No known articles related to this expedition have been published at this time.